Merchant sailing vessels 3

These are a collection of photographs that were found in a leather suitcase that had been under four feet of water for several days when my parent’s house was flooded in 1993. They were dried out but, needless to say, they are in not in their original state. I have put them together in small galleries for those who are interested in the history of the Westcountry trading ketches and also the history of Bude.

They were collected by my grandfather and, I believe, some he inherited from his father, during his years as master of the Ceres, a Westcountry trading ketch. I have no record of whether he took any of these photographs himself but I note that most of them are of ships in ports that Ceres would have visited. TheĀ captions are copies of the notes on the back of the photographs – I have added the punctuation.

Links: Merchant sailing vessels 1, Merchant sailing vessels 2.

(Click on image to enlarge)

'Pommern', Finnish four-masted barque in dry-dock at Birkenhead, March 1928

‘Pommern’, Finnish four-masted barque in dry-dock at Birkenhead, March 1928

'Queen of the West' of Milford, built 1849 by Vivien at Salcombe, about 105 tons registered, this vessel draws 13 feet aft when fully loaded

‘Queen of the West’ of Milford, built 1849 by Vivien at Salcombe, about 105 tons registered, this vessel draws 13 feet aft when fully loaded

Reading from left to right: 'Mary Ann' of Guernsey, 'Forest Weel' of Dublin, 'Brackley' of Liverpool

Reading from left to right: ‘Mary Ann’ of Guernsey, ‘Forest Weel’ of Dublin, ‘Brackley’ of Liverpool

'Salisbury' of Rauma, discharging timber at Garston

‘Salisbury’ of Rauma, discharging timber at Garston

'Salisbury' of Rauma, Finnish schooner, 579 tons gross, built 1903 by Kelly Spear and Co. at Bath, USA

‘Salisbury’ of Rauma, Finnish schooner, 579 tons gross, built 1903 by Kelly Spear and Co. at Bath, USA

'Snowflake' of Runcorn, built 1880 by Bundril of Runcorn

‘Snowflake’ of Runcorn, built 1880 by Bundril of Runcorn

'Tarragona' of Whitehaven, formerly a barquentine

‘Tarragona’ of Whitehaven, formerly a barquentine

'Uncle Ned' of Dublin, built 1867 by Robertson, Ipswich. The small schooner alongside is 'Brackley' of Liverpool, 68 tons. She ('Brackley') went ashore at St Patrick's Bridge, Kilmore and became a total wreck as recently as  September 30th (no year given)

‘Uncle Ned’ of Dublin, built 1867 by Robertson, Ipswich. The small schooner alongside is ‘Brackley’ of Liverpool, 68 tons. She (‘Brackley’) went ashore at St Patrick’s Bridge, Kilmore and became a total wreck as recently as September 30th (no year given)

The E.R. Sterling was a American six-masted barquentine, built 1883 at Harland & Wolff, Belfast, as the four-masted ship Lord Wolseley. Lord Wolseley delivered to Irish Shipowners Co. (T. Dixon & Sons), Belfast. 1898 sold to J.C. Tidemann & Co., Bremen, was reduced to barque rig and renamed Columbia. 1904 sold to C.E. Peabody, Vancouver, was remasted and rerigged to a six-masted barkentine and renamed Everett G. Griggs. 1910 sold to E.R. Stirling, Blaine, WA, and was renamed E.R. Sterling. Broken up at Sunderland in 1928. (My gratitude to Bob for identifying the ship – details from commons.wikimpedia.org)

Unidentified

Unidentified

Unnamed ketch

'Via' of Brixham, built 1864 by Upham, Brixham

‘Via’ of Brixham, built 1864 by Upham, Brixham

'Volant' of Kirkwall, built 1867 by Geddie, Banff, was damaged by fire 1923 at the tail of The Bank when on passage from Dublin to Belfast. Still running.

‘Volant’ of Kirkwall, built 1867 by Geddie, Banff, was damaged by fire 1923 at the tail of The Bank when on passage from Dublin to Belfast. Still running.

 

2 thoughts on “Merchant sailing vessels 3

  1. “Unidentified” 5 master has 6 masts and the name is on the picture – E. R. Sterling

  2. Thank you, Bob.
    Apart from my inability to count, I had assumed E R Sterling was the signature of the sender of the photograph.
    Never assume!
    Thanks again, Bill

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s